KKids-Christmas

It’s the most beautiful time of the year.

Christmas brings family and friends together. it helps us appreciate the love in our lives we can often take for granted. May the true meaning of the holiday season fill your heart and home with many blessings. May this holiday season sparkle and shine, may all of your wishes and dreams come true, and may you feel this happiness all year round.

Nursery-RhymesNursery Rhymes

Nursery rhymes offer oral support to children and aid in their development of hearing awareness. They are part of children’s pre-literacy skills, being an important pillar in their cognitive development. Their value to children’s language and learning foundation cannot be underestimated.


Learning nursery rhymes helps children develop: phonemic awareness, memory and articulation, it helps children’s understanding of concepts: painting pictures in children’s heads, social routines, and Listening skills.


The activity it simple: Revisit your old favourite nursery rhymes, learn new ones! Use them to transition between activities or read nursery rhyme books at bedtime.

 

Waste Free Gift-Wrapping Tips

Most wrapping paper isn’t recyclable and during the festive season, Australians use 150,000km of it… here’s how you can keep it waste-free under your tree.


Let’s start with how you secure your wrapping because sticky tape isn’t reusable. Try ribbon, twine or a peg.
To the right are a few options you can easily try at home. Firstly, wrapping in newspaper and twine is surprisingly sophisticated.

Fabric wraps and tea-towels create beautiful reusable wrapping. Why not simply use some of the totes/reusable bags you almost certainly have lying around at home. And finally, one of my favourites, bits and pieces you have at home or better yet children’s artwork they’re happing to part with or give to family and friends.

Waste-Free-Gift-Wrapping-Tips

5 Ways To Practice Gratitude With Your Kids

This time of year, we’re frequently reminded to give thanks for the good things in our lives. But when decorations come down and school starts back up, the prompts to practice gratitude fade away. So how can parents encourage kids to recognize goodness year-round?


This article is written by Maryam Abdullah, Ph.D. She is the Parenting Program Director of the Greater Good Science Centre. She is a developmental psychologist with expertise in parent-child relationships and children’s development of prosocial behaviours.


1. DISCOVER WHAT GRATITUDE MEANS TO YOU
Gratitude can be a difficult concept for adults to grasp — let alone little ones. Maryam says gratitude is really about recognising goodness outside of ourselves. Goodness can be big things, like happiness, love, family, and health. It can also be small things, like hugs, green lights, and ice cream. It’s up to you to decide the goodness you want to recognise. Once you understand how gratitude aligns with your own values, you can start talking about it with your kids.


2. SHARE HOW GOODNESS MAKES YOU FEEL
Practicing gratitude doesn’t always have to be a formal act of recognition. It can be as simple or easy as thanking your child for a hug or kiss. 


Practice-Gratitude-With-Your-Kids


3. ASK YOUR KIDS ABOUT THEIR GRATITUDE
Kids aren’t always great at describing their feelings. Maryam recommends sparking conversations based on four parts that make up the gratitude experience. What we NOTICE in our lives for which we can be grateful. How we THINK about why we have been given those things. How we FEEL about the things we have been given. What we DO to express appreciation in turn. Asking Notice-Think-Feel-Do questions is a simple way to scaffold your child’s understanding or perception of something that’s good in their life.


4. ENCOURAGE YOUR KIDS TO DOCUMENT THEIR GRATITUDE
Try a Gratitude Journal: Recognising goodness in writing can be a ritual in the morning when they wake up or in the evening as a reflection about how the day went. Photo Essays: If writing isn’t the right activity for your child, they could take pictures of things that they’re grateful for and build up a library of photos of the good things and gifts in their lives.


5. PRACTICE TURNING GRATITUDE INTO A HABIT
Each time you demonstrate and talk about gratitude with your kids, you’re helping them build valuable skills for their emotional toolbox.


Bradley, Cailyn. (2020). 5 Ways to Practice Gratitude with Your Kids. Retrieved from www.kiwico.com/blog/2020/11/19/5-ways-to-practice-gratitude-with-your-kids/

 

Health & Safety: Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke

Babies and children need to be watched carefully during hot weather carefully because they are at a higher risk of becoming unwell than adults.


Things to remember


+ Babies and children overheat and dehydrate quickly in hot weather
+ Breastfeed or bottle-feed your baby more often in hot weather
+ Offer older babies and children extra drinks in hot weather, the best drink is water
+ Dress babies and children in cool clothing and protect them from the sun with hats and sunscreen
+ Never leave children in the car, not even for a moment


How does hot weather affect my baby or child? Hot weather can affect your baby or child because their bodies cannot adjust to changes in temperature as well as adults. Babies and children sweat less, reducing their bodies’ ability to cool down, and they generate more heat during exercise than adults. They are at risk of overheating and developing a heat-related illness. Heat can also make existing illnesses worse.


Keep your baby and child healthy in hot weather Follow these tips to keep your baby and child healthy in hot weather. If your child is sick (fever, vomiting or diarrhoea, or even a mild cold), they need extra attention to ensure they remain well hydrated and don’t overheat. See your doctor if your child is unwell.

 

Heat-Exhaustion-Heat-Stroke


Drinking enough fluids: Offer drinks or breastfeeds frequently. A good indicator that a baby is getting enough fluids is if it has six to eight pale wet nappies in a 24-hour period. Offer young children water as their main drink throughout the day. Fruit juice, fruit-based drinks and fizzy drinks are not recommended. Older children often forget to drink because they are busy playing. Encourage your older child to drink regularly.


Keep Cool: Dress in cool clothes. Ensure sleeping environments are cool and there is good fresh air circulation. When out and about try and spend the hottest part of the day inside. If you go out in the sun stay in the shade when possible, where a wide brim hat and loose clothing. Use small amounts of 30+ Sunscreen on skin which cannot be covered. On hot days, take breaks out of the heat and drink plenty of fluids.


Cars: Never leave babies, children or pets alone in a car, not even for a moment. Babies and children can overheat very quickly in cars. The temperature inside a parked car can be 30-40°C hotter than outside the car. Most of the temperature increase occurs within five minutes of closing the car and having the windows down 5 cm causes only a very slight decrease in temperature.


Signs and symptoms of heat-related illness and what to do for your baby or child:


Heat exhaustion: Signs and symptoms – Looking unwell and more irritable than usual, Pale and clammy skin, Sleepy and floppy, Fewer wet nappies than usual, Dark urine (normal is light straw colour), Refusing to drink (babies may feel uncomfortable to have skin contact when breastfeeding – try a towel on skin), Intense thirst (but as the baby gets weaker, he/she may drink less), Dry skin, mouth and eyes (no tears when crying), Soft spot on baby’s head (fontanelle) may be lower than usual.


Heat stroke: Signs and symptoms – (All the signs of heat exhaustion as above plus): Rising body temperature, Red, hot and dry skin, Rapid breathing, Vomiting, Confusion, Coma (not responding when touched or called)
Read this article in full and find out how to respond to your child’s symptoms here: www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/beattheheat/Pages/babies-children-hot-weather.aspx

Christmas Favourite – Strawberry Swirl Icy “North” Poles

PREP 15 min | FREEZE 4 hrs. | SERVES 10

Strawberry-Swirly

Ingredients

  • 1 punnet fresh strawberries
  • 2 teaspoons maple syrup
  • 2 cups vanilla or Greek yoghurt
  • 10 x 80ml icy pole moulds
 

Method

  1. Place the strawberries in a blender or food processor with the maple syrup and process until smooth.
  2. Spoon a small amount of the strawberry puree into the moulds, follow with a small amount of the yoghurt. Continue to layer the strawberry puree and the yoghurt until you have almost filled each of the moulds. –
  3. Place a skewer into the mould and gently mix to create the swirls, alternatively you can leave as layers. –
  4. Place the sticks, using food grade paddle pop sticks if your moulds don’t contain sticks, gently into the centre of each of the icy poles then place into the freezer for 4 hours, or until completely frozen.
  5. Storage: keep the icy poles in the freezer for up to 3 months. When you are ready to enjoy the them gently run the ice pole moulds under warm water until you can gently release the icy pole. 

Recipe and Image from One Handed Cooks – Find 11 other Christmas recipes via the link here 

Strawberry-Swirly

Ingredients

  • 1 punnet fresh strawberries
  • 2 teaspoons maple syrup
  • 2 cups vanilla or Greek yoghurt
  • 10 x 80ml icy pole moulds
 

Method

  1. Place the strawberries in a blender or food processor with the maple syrup and process until smooth.
  2. Spoon a small amount of the strawberry puree into the moulds, follow with a small amount of the yoghurt. Continue to layer the strawberry puree and the yoghurt until you have almost filled each of the moulds. –
  3. Place a skewer into the mould and gently mix to create the swirls, alternatively you can leave as layers. –
  4. Place the sticks, using food grade paddle pop sticks if your moulds don’t contain sticks, gently into the centre of each of the icy poles then place into the freezer for 4 hours, or until completely frozen.
  5. Storage: keep the icy poles in the freezer for up to 3 months. When you are ready to enjoy the them gently run the ice pole moulds under warm water until you can gently release the icy pole. 

Recipe and Image from One Handed Cooks – Find 11 other Christmas recipes via the link here